The Field

The Field

Project scope

It is up to us to go to extreme places, to extreme times, where the highest and deepest truths live and rise up — Gilles Deleuze

The Field is a term we are developing to express two parallel concepts. First, drawing on theoretical physics, and more specifically String Theory, the Field is the total volume of matter on all scales (what is sometimes in String Theory also called “the landscape”). From a base of resonant strings, everything else ascends according to complex interactions of multi-dimensional vibrations. From a human time perspective, the outcomes (from theoretical Planck length to subatomic particles and beyond to large scale matter) have a degree of regularity, even though on different time scales everything is forming or degrading, or mutating to new forms. The Field is an orientation to physical, material reality that opens questions about human time perception, human destiny, collectively and individually, and the impact of matter (which is to say resonance) on human behaviour and the environment in which the human species has emerged and continues — along with everything else — to evolve. Complementary to the Deleuzian concept of the plane of immanence, the Field can be a conceptual lens through which to explore materialist orientations in understanding the world.

Second, and related, the Field is what precedes the State. It is both the literal open landscape of pure nature, within which human animals would be located as animals, and also a concept to contain and describe what has been abandoned or otherwise lost when human populations entered the process of regularization to which they have been subject since the first appearance of the State. In this sense, we do conceive of the State as opposed to natural life, and indeed nature as a whole. Complementary to the orientations of “deep green” activists like Derrick Jensen, our interest is to explore what may have existed as philosophical precepts before the regularization of “men and things” commenced. What could be understood as rights before “human rights”? Do we still have the right to engage in primary nature, and on what terms amid urbanization, the mass production of food, and private property? The Field, in this sense, opens into questions of animality, disciplinary institutions, order and law, and the ecological crisis that the productionist order engenders. In this project we leap simultaneously into the past and into the future, cognisant that the State has a history and thus an end, that capitalism on a world scale is not only unjust but could drive the human species to an extinction category event, and in consciousness that as systems of power deepen, instinctive resistance multiplies, demanding that we explore alternatives.